Anxiety Sensitivity Dimensions and Generalized Anxiety‏ ‏Severity: The ‎Mediating Role of Experiential Avoidance and Repetitive‏ ‏Negative Thinking

  • Parvaneh‏ ‏ Mohammadkhani Department of Clinical Psychology, School of Behavior science, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran‎.
  • Abbas Pourshahbaz Department of Clinical Psychology, School of Behavior science, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran‎.
  • Maryam Kami Department of Clinical Psychology, School of Behavior science, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran‎.
  • Mahdi Mazidi Department of Clinical Psychology, School of Behavior science, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran‎.
  • Imaneh Abasi Department of Clinical Psychology, School of Behavior science, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran‎.
Keywords: Anxiety Sensitivity, Experiential Avoidance, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Repetitive Thinking, Trans-diagnostic Mechanisms

Abstract

Objective: Generalized anxiety disorder is one of the most common anxiety disorders in the general ‎population. Several studies suggest that anxiety sensitivity is a vulnerability factor in generalized ‎anxiety severity. However, some other studies suggest that negative repetitive thinking and ‎experiential avoidance as response factors can explain this relationship. Therefore, this study ‎aimed to investigate the mediating role of experiential avoidance and negative repetitive thinking ‎in the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and generalized anxiety severity.‎

Method: This was a cross-sectional and correlational study. A sample of 475 university students was ‎selected through stratified sampling method. The participants completed Anxiety Sensitivity ‎Inventory-3, Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II, Perseverative Thinking Questionnaire, and ‎Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item Scale. Data were analyzed by Pearson correlation, multiple ‎regression analysis and path analysis.‎

Results: The results revealed a positive relationship between anxiety sensitivity, particularly cognitive ‎anxiety sensitivity, experiential avoidance, repetitive thinking and generalized anxiety severity. In ‎addition, findings showed that repetitive thinking, but not experiential avoidance, fully mediated ‎the relationship between cognitive anxiety sensitivity and generalized anxiety severity. α Level ‎was p<0.005.‎

Conclusion: Consistent with the trans-diagnostic hypothesis, anxiety sensitivity predicts generalized anxiety‏ ‏severity, but its effect is due to the generating repetitive negative thought.‎

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Published
2016-10-09
How to Cite
1.
MohammadkhaniP‏, Pourshahbaz A, Kami M, Mazidi M, Abasi I. Anxiety Sensitivity Dimensions and Generalized Anxiety‏ ‏Severity: The ‎Mediating Role of Experiential Avoidance and Repetitive‏ ‏Negative Thinking. Iran J Psychiatry. 11(3):140-146.
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Original Article(s)