Impact of Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Gene Polymorphisms on Risk of Schizophrenia: A Case-Control Study and Computational Analyses

  • Saman Sargazi ORCID Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Resistant Tuberculosis Institute, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran.
  • Fariba Mirani Sargazi ORCID Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Resistant Tuberculosis Institute, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran.
  • Mahdiyeh Moudi ORCID Genetics of Noncommunicable Disease Research Center, Resistant Tuberculosis Institute, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran.
  • Milad Heidari Nia ORCID Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Resistant Tuberculosis Institute, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran.
  • Ramin Saravani ORCID Mail Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Resistant Tuberculosis Institute, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran. AND Department of Clinical Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran.
  • Shekoufeh Mirinejad ORCID Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Resistant Tuberculosis Institute, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran.
  • Sheida Shahraki ORCID Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Resistant Tuberculosis Institute, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran.
  • Mansoor Shakiba ORCID Department of Psychiatry, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran.
Keywords:
Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ (PPAR Gamma), Polymorphism, rs1801282, rs3856806, Schizophrenia

Abstract

Objective: Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a common psychiatric disorder characterized by a complex mode of inheritance. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARG) mainly regulates lipid and glucose metabolisms while it is constitutively expressed in rat primary microglial cultures. This preliminary study was aimed to investigate the relationship of two polymorphisms in the PPARG gene, rs1801282 C/G, and rs3856806 C/T, to the risk of SCZ in the southeast Iranian population.
Method: A total of 300 participants (150 patients with SCZ and 150 healthy controls) were enrolled. Genotyping was done using the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction (ARMS–PCR) technique. Computational analyses were carried out to predict the potential effects of the studied polymorphisms.
Results: A significant link was found between genotypes of rs1801282 and SCZ susceptibility. The G allele of rs1801282 in CG and GG form of the codominant model increased the risk of SCZ by 2.49 and 2.64 folds, respectively. With regards to rs3856806, enhanced risk of SCZ was also observed under different inheritance models except for the overdominant model. Also, the T allele of rs3856806 enhanced the risk of SCZ by 3.19 fold. Computational analyses predicted that rs1801282 polymorphism might alter the secondary structure of PPARG-mRNA and protein function. At the same time, the other variant created the binding sites for some enhancer and silencer motifs.
Conclusion: Our findings showed that PPARG rs1821282 and rs3856806 polymorphisms associate with SCZ susceptibility. Replication studies in different ethnicities with a larger population are needed to validate our findings.

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Published
2020-09-12
How to Cite
1.
Sargazi S, Mirani Sargazi F, Moudi M, Heidari Nia M, Saravani R, Mirinejad S, Shahraki S, Shakiba M. Impact of Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Gene Polymorphisms on Risk of Schizophrenia: A Case-Control Study and Computational Analyses. Iran J Psychiatry. 15(4):286-296.
Section
Original Article(s)